• EWAD UK

Learning more about Down syndrome | 7 Years of EWAD UK

This post will be an educative post on Down's syndrome.


Down's syndrome is when you're born with an extra chromosome. You usually get an extra chromosome by chance, because of a change in the sperm or egg before you're born.


Therapies for Down Syndrome

  • Speech-language Therapy: Speech-language therapy addresses communication and language skills by focusing on articulation, cognitive skills, and strengthening the oral muscles (tongue, lips)

  • Physical Therapy

  • Occupational Therapy

  • Assistive Technology

  • Special Education


What it's like to have Down's syndrome

  • People with Down's syndrome will have some level of learning disability. This means they'll have a range of abilities.

  • Some people will be more independent and do things like get a job. Other people might need more regular care.

  • But, like everyone, people with Down's syndrome have:

  • their own personalities

  • things they like and dislike

  • things that make them who they are


What its like to have Down's Syndrome

  • ∙People with Down's syndrome will have some level of learning disability. This means they'll have a range of abilities.

  • ∙Some people will be more independent and do things like get a job. Other people might need more regular care.

  • ∙But, like everyone, people with Down's syndrome have:

  • ∙their own personalities

  • ∙things they like and dislike

  • ∙things that make them who they are


Things that you can do to help

Children and young people with Down's syndrome are likely to have some level of learning disability. This means they may need help with daily life. What they need help with is different for each person. And this can change as they get older. You can try these things to help with their development.


Do

  • praise them when they learn something new

  • speak clearly and calmly so they can learn from you

  • play, sing songs and read books together to help with sounds and words

  • try showing them how to do something instead of just giving instructions – this can be easier to follow

  • try ways to help them communicate such as Signalong, Makaton or PECS

  • try to set routines so they feel more settled – for example, for getting up and at mealtimes

  • encourage them to be healthy and active – find activities on the Down's Syndrome Association DSActive website

  • look out for changes in mood or behaviour – they may not be able to tell you something's wrong or they're unwell

  • take them for regular hearing, eyesight and health checks


Don’t

  • do not talk down to people with Down's syndrome – treat them like anyone their age

  • do not just talk to parents or carers, talk directly to people with Down's syndrome

  • do not use outdated and offensive language when talking to people with Down's syndrome – see the Down's Syndrome Association language guide


Where you can get support

  • It might help to speak to other parents, families and charities who know how you're feeling.

  • Down's Syndrome Association

  • For people with Down's syndrome, their parents and carers.

  • Call their helpline: 0333 1212 300

  • Visit their website: www.downs-syndrome.org.uk

  • Email: info@downs-syndrome.org.uk


Author:

Mrs. Queen Nwokporo

Ward Sister,

Prescriber,

Advanced Clinical Practitioner.



References

∙NHS (2019) Available at: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/downs-syndrome/advice-for-new-parents/. Accessed: 18/02/2022.

∙Down Syndrome UK (2021) https://www.downs-syndrome.org.uk/ Accessed: 18/02/2022.


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